Newbery Reviews: 1942

I'm continuing my journey through the Newbery books with reviews of the 1942 Newbery winners. | Book reviews by NewberyandBeyond.com
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Today’s post covers the 1942 Newbery books, which are all historical fiction. (All summaries via Goodreads.com)

Medal Winner: The Matchlock Gun

In 1756, New York State was still a British colony, and the French and the Indians were constant threats to Edward and his family. When his father was called away to watch for a raid from the north, only Edward was left to protect Mama and little Trudy. His father had shown him how to use the huge matchlock gun, an old Spanish gun that was twice as long as he was, but would Edward be able to handle it if trouble actually came?

I have close to no memory of this book. I enjoyed it, as I did most of the historical fiction I read as a child. But I’m not sure if I would bother re-reading it now.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

Little Town on the Prairie

The long winter is finally over, and with spring comes a new job for Laura, town parties, and more time to spend with Almanzo Wilder. Laura also tries to help Pa and Ma save money for Mary to go to college.

Yes, it’s another Laura Ingalls Wilder book. This one is slightly different from the other Little House books (they’re in a town!). As always when I review these books, I feel like there’s not a lot for me to say. Others have much sweeter memories of this series than I do, and all the books have kind of blended together for me. Still, it’s a Little House book! It’s worth reading at least once.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

 

Indian Captive: The Story of Mary Jemison

In this classic frontier adventure, Lois Lenski reconstructs the real life story of Mary Jemison, who was captured in a raid as young girl and raised amongst the Seneca Indians. Meticulously researched and illustrated with many detailed drawings, this novel offers an exceptionally vivid and personal portrait of Native American life and customs.

Of all the historical fiction I read during my childhood years, this one really sticks out in my memory. A young girl is kidnapped by Native Americans, and she and her family are both distraught–at the beginning. Over time, however, Mary becomes assimilated with the Seneca tribe and wants to stay with them, even when her family comes to rescue her.

I don’t remember much about the details of this book now, so I’d be interested to see how I feel about it now. I’ve read a huge amount of early Newbery books about Native Americans, written by everyone but Native Americans, and I have found that hugely frustrating. I’m never sure how accurate those stories are, or how insensitive. Still, I appreciate that this novel is at least based on a true event, and I might revisit it in the future.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

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