Newbery Reviews: 1942

I'm continuing my journey through the Newbery books with reviews of the 1942 Newbery winners. | Book reviews by NewberyandBeyond.com
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Today’s post covers the 1942 Newbery books, which are all historical fiction. (All summaries via Goodreads.com)

Medal Winner: The Matchlock Gun

In 1756, New York State was still a British colony, and the French and the Indians were constant threats to Edward and his family. When his father was called away to watch for a raid from the north, only Edward was left to protect Mama and little Trudy. His father had shown him how to use the huge matchlock gun, an old Spanish gun that was twice as long as he was, but would Edward be able to handle it if trouble actually came?

I have close to no memory of this book. I enjoyed it, as I did most of the historical fiction I read as a child. But I’m not sure if I would bother re-reading it now.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

Little Town on the Prairie

The long winter is finally over, and with spring comes a new job for Laura, town parties, and more time to spend with Almanzo Wilder. Laura also tries to help Pa and Ma save money for Mary to go to college.

Yes, it’s another Laura Ingalls Wilder book. This one is slightly different from the other Little House books (they’re in a town!). As always when I review these books, I feel like there’s not a lot for me to say. Others have much sweeter memories of this series than I do, and all the books have kind of blended together for me. Still, it’s a Little House book! It’s worth reading at least once.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

 

Indian Captive: The Story of Mary Jemison

In this classic frontier adventure, Lois Lenski reconstructs the real life story of Mary Jemison, who was captured in a raid as young girl and raised amongst the Seneca Indians. Meticulously researched and illustrated with many detailed drawings, this novel offers an exceptionally vivid and personal portrait of Native American life and customs.

Of all the historical fiction I read during my childhood years, this one really sticks out in my memory. A young girl is kidnapped by Native Americans, and she and her family are both distraught–at the beginning. Over time, however, Mary becomes assimilated with the Seneca tribe and wants to stay with them, even when her family comes to rescue her.

I don’t remember much about the details of this book now, so I’d be interested to see how I feel about it now. I’ve read a huge amount of early Newbery books about Native Americans, written by everyone but Native Americans, and I have found that hugely frustrating. I’m never sure how accurate those stories are, or how insensitive. Still, I appreciate that this novel is at least based on a true event, and I might revisit it in the future.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

Newbery Reviews: El Deafo and George Washington’s World

El Deafo is an adorable and interesting graphic novel on growing up deaf. (George Washington's World wasn't bad, either!). | Book reviews by NewberyandBeyond.com
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These two Newbery books don’t really have anything to do with each other (other than the award). El Deafo is a 2015 honor book, a graphic novel about growing up deaf. George Washington’s World, on the other hand, was an honor book in 1942, and it fleshes out the history and leaders of the 1700s. The one thing these books have in common? They’re both really good!

El Deafo

“Starting at a new school is scary, even more so with a giant hearing aid strapped to your chest! At her old school, everyone in Cece’s class was deaf. Here she is different. She is sure the kids are staring at the Phonic Ear, the powerful aid that will help her hear her teacher. Too bad it also seems certain to repel potential friends.

Then Cece makes a startling discovery. With the Phonic Ear she can hear her teacher not just in the classroom, but anywhere her teacher is in school–in the hallway…in the teacher’s lounge…in the bathroom! This is power. Maybe even superpower! Cece is on her way to becoming El Deafo, Listener for All.” (Summary via Goodreads.com)

El Deafo¬†is a cute graphic novel that tackles the joys and difficulties of growing up deaf. It’s based on the author’s experiences, which I loved. This book definitely deserves the Newbery honor it received–it’s well written and drawn, and it offers representation to an underrepresented group. You’ll enjoy the book if you want to learn¬†more about growing up deaf, but every kid will also be able to relate to the topic of not fitting in.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

George Washington’s World

This book offers information on the leaders and events around the world during the 1700s. Although you might think from the title that this book focuses mainly on American history, that’s not the case. Each chapter focuses on a different character from history, from Catherine the Great to George III to John and Abigail Adams. Although the Revolutionary War is the main event, the French Revolution, the Seven Years War, and other events and leaders from Russia to China to Australia to Africa are also included. The book is full of great drawings, maps, and musical snippets, so there’s a lot of visual interest (important in a history book of this length!).

At first I was put off by the cheery way most events and people are talked about (war, slavery, colonization, etc.), but later I started to appreciate the subtlety–none of the people discussed were wholly bad or good, and the author doesn’t shy away from mentioning the less savory aspects of our forefathers’ lives, even if she doesn’t dwell on them. The other thing I love about this book is that it was updated by the author’s daughter to add diversity. This book does a better job of discussing the roles of women, Native Americans, and African-Americans during this time period than you would expect, and I really appreciated that.

Many kids may not enjoy this book because it is pretty lengthy and a straight up history book, but if you or your child has a deep interest in this time period, it’s worth looking into.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

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