Review Copy: Indiana Belle

Indiana Belle is the latest installment in John Heldt's time travel romance series. #spon | A book review by NewberyandBeyond.com
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Note: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

When doctoral student Cameron Coelho, 28, opens a package from Indiana, he finds more than private papers that will help him with his dissertation. He finds a photograph of a beautiful society editor murdered in 1925 and clues to a century-old mystery. Within days, he meets Geoffrey Bell, the “time-travel professor,” and begins an unlikely journey through the Roaring Twenties. Filled with history, romance, and intrigue, INDIANA BELLE follows a lonely soul on the adventure of a lifetime as he searches for love and answers in the age of Prohibition, flappers, and jazz. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

I’ve read and reviewed several of John Heldt’s books in the past (see the reviews here, here, and here), so I was excited to receive his latest book in the American Journey series, Indiana Belle. It’s full of romance, a bit of mystery, and, of course, time travel.

Cameron has very few ties in his present-day life, so when he gets the chance to go back in time and investigate the beautiful journalist who is a part of his doctoral dissertation, he jumps at it. When he meets Candice, the vivacious woman who captured his imagination through an old photo, he instantly falls in love and determines to do whatever it takes to save her from her tragic death–despite the warnings of Professor Bell.

The story is sweet, despite the bad case of insta-love that Cameron suffers from. You get a good feel for what the Roaring Twenties were like in small town Indiana, including everything from speakeasies to the KKK. Later in the book, Cameron takes a short trip to the future, which I found pretty fascinating (I’d love to find out more about it in later books!).

There were a couple of problems that I had with this book. The habit of using descriptors rather than names (the time traveler, the Rhode Islander, the society editor, the stodgy relative, etc.) gets a little annoying at times–I know the characters’ names, so why not use them? Also: *spoiler* I found the ending kind of unsatisfying–it celebrates Candice’s decision to quit the reporting job she had wanted the entire book to raise children and be a wife. Sure, this is probably the most historically accurate decision, but it rubbed me the wrong way.

On the whole, this is a sweet romance with the added benefit of an interesting backdrop and a little time travel, too. Check it out if you’ve enjoyed the rest of the American Journey series–you won’t be disappointed.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

About Monica

I am obsessed with all things books. I'm a music teacher by day and a freelance editor by night.

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