Newbery Reviews: 1946

All summaries via Goodreads.com

Medal Winner: Strawberry Girl

Strawberries — big, ripe, and juicy. Ten-year-old Birdie Boyer can hardly wait to start picking them. But her family has just moved to the Florida backwoods, and they haven′t even begun their planting. “Don′t count your biddies ′fore they′re hatched, gal young un!” her father tells her.

Making the new farm prosper is not easy. There is heat to suffer through, and droughts, and cold snaps. And, perhaps most worrisome of all for the Boyers, there are rowdy neighbors, just itching to start a feud.

This book has a bit of the feeling of Laura Ingalls Wilder–it’s filled with the details of running a farm (and, of course, picking strawberries). I wish I could remember more of the book, as I remember enjoying it a lot as a child. I’m putting Strawberry Girl on the list of Newbery books to re-read someday.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

Justin Morgan Had a Horse

In 1791 a Vermont schoolmaster by the name of Justin Morgan comes home with a two-year-old colt named Little Bub. Taken as payment for an outstanding debt, the little colt doesn’t seem like he is worth much, but the kindly teacher asks one of his students, Joel Goss, to train him. Joel knows the horse has great potential, and soon word about Little Bub spreads throughout the entire Northeast for his ability to outwork, outrun, outtrot, and outwalk any horse in the area.

This is the extraordinary tale of a little workhorse, who, after being born in obscurity, becomes one of the greatest breeding stallions of all time.

Ah, Marguerite Henry, the queen of the horse stories (Misty of Chincoteague is probably her most famous novel). Unlike other girls my age, I was never fascinated by horse stories, but this one was pretty enjoyable. However, I don’t feel the same need to re-read this book as I do with Strawberry Girl.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

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