My Holiday in North Korea

My Holiday in North Korea is a strange and fascinating glimpse at one of the most closed-off countries in the world. | A book review by NewberyandBeyond.com
.

Several days being chaperoned to and from deserted factories and propaganda museums? A determined (but inaccurate) hatred toward Americans and the United States–except for you, of course? Paranoia that no one around you is telling you the truth? Welcome to My Holiday in North Korea.

“In My Holiday in North Korea: The Funniest/Worst Place on Earth, Wendy shares a glimpse of North Korea as it’s never been seen before. Even though it’s the scariest place on Earth, somehow Wendy forgot to check her sense of humor at the border.

But Wendy’s initial amusement and bewilderment soon turned to frustration and growing paranoia. Before long, she learned the essential conundrum of “tourism” in North Korea: Travel is truly a love affair. But, just like love, it’s a two-way street. And North Korea deprives you of all this. They want you to fall in love with the singular vision of the country they’re willing to show you and nothing more.

Through poignant, laugh-out-loud essays and 92 color photographs of North Korea rarely published, Wendy chronicles one of the strangest vacations ever. Along the way, she bares all while undergoing an inner journey as convoluted as the country itself.” (Summary via Goodreads.com)

I found this book hilarious, depressing, and all around fascinating. The world of North Korea, the country’s attempts at propaganda, and the people themselves are so interesting.

Wendy does a great job of cataloging her mixed feelings about the country. At some points, the “perfect” world that North Korea tries to present is so outdated it’s laughable, and everything Wendy’s handlers say and do seems so scripted that Wendy starts keeping a list of things she thinks were real moments. But at other times, the incredible power that the government wields over all its citizens (and, to a lesser extent, its tourists) hits home in a horrifying way.

Wendy is an entertaining, humorous writer (although, fair warning, there is some salty language), but her photos are what really drew me in. On almost every page, there are photos of the things Wendy saw on her “propaganda tour”–empty factories, stoic guards, and large statues of Korean rulers–mixed in with a few rare unposed pictures. They are absolutely fascinating. The glimpses they provide into this extremely closed-off country are eye-opening.

If you want to get your travel fix without having to actually travel to North Korea, My Holiday in North Korea is probably your best bet.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

P.S. Have you (or someone you know) been a tourist in North Korea? I would love to hear about your experiences in the comments!

About Monica

I am obsessed with all things books. I'm a music teacher by day and a freelance editor by night.

Scroll To Top
%d bloggers like this: