Fried Green Tomatoes and Little Beach Street Bakery: A Comparison

A comparison of Fried Green Tomatoes and The Little Beach Street Bakery--they have more in common than you think. | Book reviews by NewberyandBeyond.com
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In today’s post, I’m going to do a little bit of a comparison, rather than separate reviews for these two books. As I was thinking about Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe and Little Beach Street Bakery, I realized that they actually have a lot in common–and that the reasons I loved one book are the shortcomings of the other. One is a modern-day classic; the other is a book that was hugely popular a couple of years ago.

Each of these books centers itself around two important aspects: location and food. Fried Green Tomatoes exists mainly at the Whistle Stop Cafe, the center of small town Alabama life for a tight-knit community. Little Beach Street Bakery is on a small island off the coast of England, where a recently divorced woman tries to put her life back together by baking.

First, here’s a quick summary of Fried Green Tomatoes, in case you’ve somehow missed out on reading it or seeing the movie:

It’s first the story of two women in the 1980s, of gray-headed Mrs. Threadgoode telling her life story to Evelyn, who is in the sad slump of middle age. The tale she tells is also of two women — of the irrepressibly daredevilish tomboy Idgie and her friend Ruth, who back in the thirties ran a little place in Whistle Stop, Alabama, a Southern kind of Cafe Wobegon offering good barbecue and good coffee and all kinds of love and laughter, even an occasional murder. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

Basically, this book explores life in the South during the 1930s and 1940s, as well as the life of a woman in the 1980s. This involves race relations, gender roles, midlife crises, and relationships with those who are different from you. But the book never becomes preachy (many of the main characters make questionable decisions), and each of the characters, from Idgie and Ruth to their friends and family to the elderly Mrs. Threadgoode and her unlikely friend Evelyn, is unique and flawed in a lovable way. I thought this book was lovely.

Meanwhile, here’s what happens in Little Beach Street Bakery:

Amid the ruins of her latest relationship, Polly Waterford moves far away to the sleepy seaside resort of Polbearne, where she lives in a small, lonely flat above an abandoned shop.

To distract her from her troubles, Polly throws herself into her favorite hobby: making bread. But her relaxing weekend diversion quickly develops into a passion. As she pours her emotions into kneading and pounding the dough, each loaf becomes better than the last. Soon, Polly is working her magic with nuts and seeds, olives and chorizo, and the local honey-courtesy of a handsome local beekeeper. Drawing on reserves of determination and creativity Polly never knew she had, she bakes and bakes . . . and discovers a bright new life where she least expected it. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

This book is much more centered around a romance rather than around the relationships of a cast of characters, and that basic premise already makes me less inclined to enjoy this book. I picked up this book because I had heard it described as a great summer read, light and enjoyable. But I didn’t quite feel that way about it.

While Fried Green Tomatoes centers around the Whistle Stop Cafe, its proprietors, and the many people–both locals and out of towners–who spend time there, Little Beach Street Bakery focuses more on the broken relationships in the isolated town of Polbearne. Polly has to fight with her landlady, who is desperate to cling to her monopoly on baked goods, as well as struggling with her attraction to a couple of the men she meets on the island.

While Polly eventually finds love and fulfillment in her new life, Little Beach Street Bakery never has the warmth and humor that I got from Fried Green Tomatoes. Its characters are more forgettable and less quirky–something I really missed. And although there is less talk about food in Fried Green Tomatoes than in Little Beach Street Bakery, that’s really my only complaint. Both books offer up their respective settings as important pieces of the story, but whereas the setting of Little Beach Street Bakery is cold and forbidding, just like its weather, Fried Green Tomatoes takes a cue from the warmth of a summer in the South and imbues the story with that feeling.

I’m not saying that Little Beach Street Bakery is a bad book. I enjoyed reading it, and I can see why it became so popular. But it can’t compare to the wonderful characters, setting, and quirky but heartwarming story of Fried Green Tomatoes.

About Monica

I am obsessed with all things books. I’m a music teacher by day and a freelance editor by night.

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