Classics Roundup

Reviews of my most recent forays into the classics, including Orwell, Gaskell, and Woolf. | Book reviews by NewberyandBeyond.com
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In my continual quest to catch up on all the classics I “should have” read in high school or college, I’ve collected tons of books that I’ve decided I don’t really want to read. As I sorted through my Kindle books this month, I found dozens of classics that I knew I would probably never read, and a few that I decided to give a chance. These three are a few of the books that made the cut.

A Room of One’s Own

First published on 24 October 1929, the essay was based on a series of lectures Virginia Woolf delivered at Newnham College and Girton College, two women’s colleges at Cambridge University in October 1928. While this extended essay in fact employs a fictional narrator and narrative to explore women both as writers of and characters in fiction, the manuscript for the delivery of the series of lectures, titled “Women and Fiction,” and hence the essay, are considered non-fiction. The essay is generally seen as a feminist text, and is noted in its argument for both a literal and figural space for women writers within a literary tradition dominated by patriarchy. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

Reading this book offers an interesting view of what feminism was like 100 years ago. There were some things that Virginia Woolf said that I agreed with and found fascinating, but there were also others that made me cringe. Still, I’m really glad I read it. This short book is my first by Virginia Woolf, and I look forward to reading some of her fiction in the future.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

Animal Farm

Tired of their servitude to man, a group of farm animals revolt and establish their own society, only to be betrayed into worse servitude by their leaders, the pigs, whose slogan becomes: “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” This 1945 satire addresses the socialist/communist philosophy of Stalin in the Soviet Union. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

There’s nothing I can say about this book that a million high school students haven’t said before. I was one of the few who wasn’t required to read it in high school, but reading it as an adult still wasn’t very enjoyable. It’s heavy handed and missing subtleties. Maybe I’m expecting too much from a satire, or maybe I’m just expecting the wrong things, but I admit I was glad that this book is mercifully short.

Rating: Meh

Wives and Daughters

Set in English society before the 1832 Reform Bill, Wives and Daughters centres on the story of youthful Molly Gibson, brought up from childhood by her father. When he remarries, a new step-sister enters Molly’s quiet life – loveable, but worldly and troubling, Cynthia. The narrative traces the development of the two girls into womanhood within the gossiping and watchful society of Hollingford.

Wives and Daughters is far more than a nostalgic evocation of village life; it offers an ironic critique of mid-Victorian society. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

I actually listened to this one on audiobook, and it’s a long one, clocking in at 24 hours of listening time. So I was super disappointed when I neared the end and the inevitable sweet conclusion to the romance and discovered that the author had died before finishing the book! Noooooooooooo! That disappointment aside, this is a very good book. It’s in the vein of Jane Austen, but rather than focusing on a particular woman and her love interest, this book spends a lot of time focusing on a girl and her family (with, of course, some romance thrown in as well). It’s well written and engaging. I just wish I could have gotten the fulfillment of a tidy ending!

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

Which classics have you enjoyed? Which should I skip?

About Monica

I am obsessed with all things books. I’m a music teacher by day and a freelance editor by night.

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