Book Pairing: The Phantom Tollbooth and Stardust

This book pairing is a fun mix of magic, drama, and adventure. | A book review by NewberyandBeyond.com
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I’m continuing my posts in the Reading to Distraction book pairing challenge (you can read the previous posts here, here, and here) with another couple of books that I truly enjoyed, even before I thought of putting them together.

The books in this pairing are The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster with illustrations by Jules Feiffer and Stardust by my favorite, Neil Gaiman. According to BuzzFeed, here’s the connection:

It’s the playfulness of The Phantom Tollbooth that wins over its readers (and, really, it’s one of the children’s books that warrants revisiting), and Neil Gaiman’s Stardust captures that same sense expertly. When Tristan Thorn embarks on a quest to find a fallen star, he encounters witches, elf-lords, a captain of a flying ship, and all manners of eccentrics that will stay with the reader long after the book is finished.

The Phantom Tollbooth

Milo mopes in black ink sketches, until he assembles a tollbooth and drives through. He jumps to the island of Conclusions. But brothers King Azaz of Dictionopolis and the Mathemagician of Digitopolis war over words and numbers. Joined by ticking watchdog Tock and adult-size Humbug, Milo rescues the Princesses of Rhyme and Reason, and learns to enjoy life. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

I read this book several times as a child and loved it, even though parts of it always creeped me out. I always loved reading about other worlds in which everything was neatly organized into specific countries (I was kind of a weird kid), and this book filled that need for me. The Phantom Tollbooth is also full of wordplay, which both children and adults can enjoy. The illustrations work perfectly with this strange, magical story.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

Stardust

Hopelessly crossed in love, a boy of half-fairy parentage leaves his mundane Victorian-English village on a quest for a fallen star in the magical realm. The star proves to be an attractive woman with a hot temper, who plunges with our hero into adventures featuring witches, the lion and the unicorn, plotting elf-lords, ships that sail the sky, magical transformations, curses whose effects rebound, binding conditions with hidden loopholes and all the rest. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

Not only a great book by Neil Gaiman, but also a pretty funny movie. (Do be forewarned, though, that if you watched the movie first, the book will be quite a bit darker and more “adult” than the movie was.) This is one of the less creepy of Neil Gaiman’s worlds, but it still has that dark, not-quite-earthly flavor that Gaiman is so good at producing. There’s adventure, humor, and lots of magic as Tristan makes his way through the land beyond the wall in an attempt to bring back a star.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

Both of these books show their heroes making the leap from the dull, ordinary world into a world of magic and adventure–Milo through a tollbooth, Tristan through a wall in a seemingly empty field. Both are well written and lots of fun. If you’re into magical adventures with a sense of humor, you could do much worse than this book pairing.

Have you read either of these books? How do you think they stack up to each other? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

About Monica

I am obsessed with all things books. I’m a music teacher by day and a freelance editor by night.

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