Photography Books: Abandoned America + Apples of Uncommon Character

These photography books offer gorgeous photos and fascinating stories combined. | Book reviews by NewberyandBeyond.com
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I’m not sure what to call this type of book, in which the photos are the main draw and the writing is almost secondary (coffee table books, perhaps?). I settled on photography books, which I think describes the attraction. Both of these books are worth a look.

Abandoned America: Dismantling the Dream

If the creation of a structure represents the values and ideals of a time, so too does its subsequent abandonment and eventual destruction. In “Abandoned America: Dismantling the Dream,” internationally acclaimed photographer Matthew Christopher continues his tour of the quiet catastrophes dotting American cities, examining the losses and failures that led these ruins to become forsaken by communities that once celebrated them. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

I am weirdly obsessed with abandoned places, so this book is right up my alley. It’s filled with amazing photographs and descriptions of abandoned places, from a classic ghost town to abandoned institutions, schools, game farms, and more. The photos by themselves are fascinating, but the stories of how and why these places were abandoned adds so much to the book.

My single complaint about this book is that it significantly needs a final edit. I try not to be nitpicky about typos or small grammatical errors, so please note that I mean more than those small problems in my critique of this book. There are unfinished sentences, as well as editorial notes that I know the author and/or editor never meant to be seen. It distracts the reader a bit from the wonderful storytelling, but it’s still not enough to deter me from giving this book my highest rating. I loved it, and I can’t wait to read the author’s other similar book.

Rating: Re-read Worthy

Apples of Uncommon Character

In his classic A Geography of Oysters, Rowan Jacobsen forever changed the way America talks about its best bivalve. Now he does the same for our favorite fruit, showing us that there is indeed life beyond Red Delicious-and even Honeycrisp. While supermarkets limit their offerings to a few waxy options, apple trees with lives spanning human generations are producing characterful varieties-and now they are in the midst of a rediscovery. From heirlooms to new designer breeds, a delicious diversity of apples is out there for the eating. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

If you’ve ever refused to eat an apple because you thought it might be bland, one-note, or overly sweet, you need to explore the world of apples Jacobsen presents in Apples of Uncommon Character. This book features a collection of uncommon, often antique apples that I now want to eat immediately.

Every page has gorgeous photos of the apples, interspersed with the author’s notes on the taste, history, and usage of that type of apple and information on how Fuji, Gala, Granny Smith, and Red Delicious came to rule the American grocery. It’s fascinating stuff.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

Mysterious Children’s Fiction

I'm sharing my recent mysterious children's fiction reads, including books from Sharon Creech and Peter Abrahams. | Book reviews by NewberyandBeyond.com
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Down the Rabbit Hole

Ingrid is in the wrong place at the wrong time. Or at least her shoes are. And getting them back will mean getting tangled up in a murder investigation as complicated as the mysteries solved by her idol, Sherlock Holmes. With soccer practice, schoolwork, and the lead role in her town’s production of Alice in Wonderland, Ingrid is swamped. But as things in Echo Falls keep getting curiouser and curiouser, Ingrid realizes she must solve the murder on her own — before it’s too late! (Summary via Goodreads.com)

This is a fun, kind of dark murder mystery for MG readers. It’s pretty obvious that this is Abrahams’ first exploration of children’s fiction; some of the things Ingrid does are kind of unrealistic for a kid her age. Still, I enjoyed following Ingrid as she gets in over her head and tries to solve a murder without implicating herself.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

Pleasing the Ghost

As nine-year-old Dennis confronts the ghost of his uncle Arvie, Arvie’s eccentric antics and wonderful wordplay keep the reader laughing. But at its tender heart, the story reveals the holes left in our lives when we lose the ones we love. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

I never thought I’d dislike a book by Sharon Creech! She has written some of my favorite books of all time, but Pleasing the Ghost just didn’t do it for me. I think I’m drawn more toward Creech’s MG fiction, rather than her children’s fiction. Still, I found this book cute, and small children will probably still enjoy it.

Rating: Meh

Newbery Roundup: January 2017

The latest Newbery books, both new and old, that I've read over the past couple of months. | Book reviews by NewberyandBeyond.com
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Where the Mountain Meets the Moon

In the Valley of Fruitless Mountain, a young girl named Minli spends her days working hard in the fields and her nights listening to her father spin fantastic tales about the Jade Dragon and the Old Man of the Moon. Minli’s mother, tired of their poor life, chides him for filling her head with nonsense. But Minli believes these enchanting stories and embarks on an extraordinary journey to find the Old Man of the Moon and ask him how her family can change their fortune. She encounters an assorted cast of characters and magical creatures along the way, including a dragon who accompanies her on her quest.

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon was so lovely! Minli’s journey to find the Old Man of the Moon was such a fun way to string together the Chinese folk stories that author Grace Lin grew up reading. Plus there is beautiful full color art. This is a quick read that should be on your (or your child’s) TBR list.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

The Tangle-Coated Horse

Ella Young was born in 1867 in the little village of Feenagh, County Antrim. “From childhood I heard tales of ghosts, banshees, haunted castles, mischievous and friendly sprites, snatches of ballads, and political arguments….It was not until I came to Dublin and met Standish O’Grady, A.E., and Kuna Meyer that I realized what a heritage waited for me in Celtic literature. I read every translation I could get, learned Irish, and betook myself to Gaelic Ireland where, by turf fires, I could hear the poems of the Fianna recited by folk who had heard the faery music and danced in faery circles…”

This is one of the old, out of print Honor books that I’ve ordered through interlibrary loan. I’m finding that most of the books that fall into that category are short story collections, which I’m not a big fan of (as you might remember). This one, a collection of tales about ancient Ireland and the magical creatures that lived there, is not too bad, but I found myself getting bored much of the time. I have a feeling your kids will probably feel the same way about it.

Rating: Meh

Vaino

Tales and legends from Finland form the background to this story of a modern Finnish boy who is a student during the Finnish Revolution of World War I that freed that country from oppressive Russian rule.

Vaino was surprisingly enjoyable. Expecting another short story collection (see above), I was glad to find that the majority of this book consists of historical fiction focused on Finland in the early 20th century. There are short stories here about the fictional creatures and gods that populated ancient Finland (of course there are), but they are interspersed with the real-life events of the Finnish revolution during WWI and the adventures of Vaino, a young Finnish boy who gets caught up in these events. The intertwining of these two threads made this book work.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

In the Beginning

A thought-provoking collection of twenty-five stories that reflect the wonder and glory of the origins of the world and humankind. With commentary by the author.

You know I love Virginia Hamilton. This Newbery book of hers, In the Beginning, retells many of the world’s creation stories. The book is filled with great illustrations and explanations of these myths, including the various types of creation stories. I didn’t find this book as compelling as the last Virginia Hamilton I read, but I certainly don’t regret reading it.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

The Year of Billy Miller

When Billy Miller has a mishap at the statue of the Jolly Green Giant at the end of summer vacation, he ends up with a big lump on his head. What a way to start second grade, with a lump on your head! As the year goes by, though, Billy figures out how to navigate elementary school, how to appreciate his little sister, and how to be a more grown up and responsible member of the family and a help to his busy working mom and stay-at-home dad.

If you’ve read as many Newbery books as I have, you start to realize that there are major themes for the different time periods in which they’ve given the award. As mentioned above, many of the early Newbery books are collections of myths and short stories, while the 70s and 80s brought a glut of historical fiction. The most recent decade or so has been marked by unique, easy-to-read writing styles and a branching out from the topics of previous years.

The Year of Billy Miller, a Newbery honor book from 2014, fits nicely into that description. It’s a sweet story about a wonderful, ordinary second grade year. In four consecutive sections, seven-year-old Billy learns how to get along with his teacher, his mother, his sister, and his father. Your second grader will almost certainly enjoy this book.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

ARC: Jorie and the Magic Stones

Jorie and the Magic Stones is the beginning of a children's fantasy series by A.H. Richardson. #spon | Book review by NewberyandBeyond.com
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Note: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

When Marjorie went to live with her frosty maiden aunt, she couldn’t imagine the adventures she would have with dragons — good and bad — and all the strange creatures that live in a mysterious land beneath the Tarn. The spunky 9-year-old redhead forges an unlikely friendship with an insecure young boy named Rufus who lives with his crusty grandfather next door. When Jorie — for that is what she prefers to be called — finds a dusty ancient book about dragons, she learns four strange words that will send the two of them into a mysterious land beneath the Tarn, riddled with enchantment and danger. Hungry for adventure, the children take the plunge, quite literally, and find themselves in the magic land of Cabrynthius. (Summary via Goodreads.com)

Jorie is a young girl with a lot of spunk, so when she goes to live with her strict, elderly aunt, of course she gets into mischief. Jorie teams up with the boy next door, Rufus, whom she drags along on her adventures. The two find a book full of dragons and words they can’t understand, which helps transport them to a world of magic.

Let me start by saying that I loved the characters in the real world. Jorie, her aunt, the housekeeper, Rufus and his grandfather–their interactions were so fun. Each character has a unique voice and personality, even the characters who don’t get enough page time to be fully fleshed out.

My one issue with the story is the fantasy world. Although the characters here are also interesting, I found the world itself a bit flat. The issue that I sometimes have with fantasy novels is that they fall quickly into cliches, and there was a bit of that issue in Jorie and the Magic Stones. I found myself looking forward to the time the characters spent in the real world, rather than in Cabrynthius. Still, the MG kids this novel is aimed toward may feel differently about that than I do.

For me personally, I thought this book was enjoyable but forgettable. But if you have a child who loves dragons and magic, they might want to give Jorie and the Magic Stones a shot.

Rating: Good but Forgettable

2017 Book Challenges

I'm excited to be joining two book challenges this year--one focusing on Newbery books and the other on classic books. | NewberyandBeyond.com
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A couple of years ago, I participated in a book pairing challenge, but last year I somehow ended up with no book challenges. I want to change that this year, so I’m joining up with two book challenges!

The first challenge is a Newbery book challenge, so you know I had to join. This one is being hosted by Smiling Shelves, and participants can get points by reading Newbery Medal or Honor books as well as Caldecott books. Because reading all the Newbery books is the whole reason I started this blog, I’m going to aim for the highest challenge level (Konigsburg, which is 75+ points).

The second challenge is a classic books challenge hosted by Books and Chocolate. Reading the classics that I somehow missed is another reading goal that I’ve been attempting, so I’m excited to have this challenge to keep me on track. I’m hoping to complete all twelve challenges, but this one is sure to be more difficult than the Newbery challenge. I really struggle with reading classics when I’m not in the mood to trudge through antiquated writing and slow plots. (I’m going to do my best to read books from this list.)

What about you guys? Are any of you joining a book challenge this year?

What I’m Into + January Small Goals

I'm linking up on the blog today to share what I'm into recently + my January small goals. | NewberyandBeyond.com
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As always, I’m linking up with writes like a girl for my January small goals, and Leigh Kramer for my monthly what I’m into.

December was a whirlwind of parties, concerts, and family get-togethers, but I still somehow managed to get things done!

  • Organize all my bookish statistics for the year. You can see that post here.
  • Post watercolor pieces on my Etsy store. Yes! The watercolor gift tags I made last month were one of my favorite pieces so far. Be sure to check out the Etsy store, and be on the lookout for even more pieces to come this month.
  • Create space to relax. I did this! The first half of the month was crazy, but since I had some time off between Christmas and New Year’s, I was able to do a lot of things that filled my relaxation need: eating out with friends, playing board games with the roommates, watching movies with my husband, and (of course) doing lots of reading.
  • Read through my backlog of books. Mostly. I’m counting this one as completed because I did read a significant amount during the last few weeks of 2016… but I still have a huge stack of books by my bed. Some were gifts or last-minute purchases, but I also have a large amount of library books I need to burn through before I have to return them!
  • Sponsor a businesswoman through Kiva. Yep! (If you want to check out Half the Sky, the book that helped inspire this goal, you can read my review of it here.)

I am absolutely thrilled at completing all of my goals for December! (I think this may be the first month that has actually happened.) Now, for my brand-new January small goals:

  • Post three new items on the N&B Etsy store. I’m bubbling over with ideas, including some bookish-related items, and now that the holidays are over I’m hoping to have enough time to complete a few of them.
  • Start meal planning. I hate the idea of meal planning, but since my husband and I are both getting busier at work (more on that below), I know it needs to happen. Unless we want to continue eating dinner at 9:00 every night. (If you have any favorite recipes that are quick, tasty, and somewhat healthy, please let me know in the comments!)
  • Do a joint book review with my sister. Posting more joint reviews is one of my overall goals for 2017, so I figure I might as well start now! My sister has posted on the blog before, and it’s always a lot of fun to talk books with her.
  • Take care of home maintenance tasks. Why does it seem like the lightbulbs burn out, faucets leak, and doorknobs get loose all at the same time? I’ve been ignoring these small inconveniences for waaaay longer than a responsible home-renter should.
  • Continue to carve out time for relaxation (and reading!). I’ve just added more time to my work schedule, which means I’ll need to be more intentional about getting things done around the house (see above), but it also means that I’ll need to focus on relaxing. It sounds silly, but if I’m not careful, I’ll spend all my downtime spinning my wheels, trying to complete tasks and worrying about things that I can’t change. (Anybody else have this problem??)

What I’m Into

Books I’m looking forward to reading: Connie Willis’s Doomsday Book is still sitting next to my bed. I’m waiting for the perfect time to dig in. I also have some new books from two of my other favorite authors, Jasper Fforde and Shannon Hale.

TV shows I’ve been watching: My husband and I finally finished watching Veronica Mars (the TV series and the movie), and I am totally obsessed! I wish there were more seasons to watch, but I’ve heard the Veronica Mars audio books (written by show creator Rob Thomas and narrated by Kristen Bell) are really good.

Music I’m loving: I can’t stop listening to Don’t Stop Me Now by Queen. (If you don’t mind a bit of raunchy humor, this interpretive dance to the song is hilarious!)

Podcasts I’m listening to: I’m not usually a fan of D&D-related media, but my husband and I are hooked on The Adventure Zone podcast. The McElroy brothers and their dad are hilarious. (Listen at your own risk! There’s a lot of swearing and sexual innuendo here.)

My favorite Instagram:

I love to take part in the Broke & Bookish secret Santa swap, and I got some lovely gifts from my secret Santa this year.

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If you’d like to follow me on Instagram (I post lots of book pictures and some of my hand lettering ventures), you can do so here.

If you want to see more of what I’m into every month, along with sneak peeks and my favorite posts from the blog, sign up for my email newsletter! It’ll show up in your inbox once a month and bring you the latest blog news and the things I’m loving.

Happy New Year 2017!

Happy New Year from Newbery and Beyond! I'm sharing my bookish stats and goals on the blog. | NewberyandBeyond.com
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Happy New Year, everyone! I love how the New Year always causes a lot of reflection and goal setting, and I’m going to continue my tradition of posting a summary of the books I read over the past year. If you like a good statistical breakdown, this post is for you.

This year, I read 251 books, which is up significantly from last year’s 196 books. How did I do this? Honestly, I have no idea. I didn’t do anything to push myself to read more (other than check out masses of books from the library).

33% of these books were diverse books, which I defined as written by or about underrepresented groups. Books in translation, books about feminism, books about countries other than America or England, and books by or about people of color, people with disabilities, people who identify as LGBTI, or adherents of non-Christian religions all fell into this category. (I’m excited about this percentage, since I made a resolution last January to read 25% diverse books.)

I read a huge variety of genres this year, including biographies, thrillers, comics, and graphic novels. The most significant percentages are the 7% children’s books; 6% YA; almost 16% mysteries (this is partly because I got hooked on a very long series, but also because I love me some mysteries); 14% Newbery books; and 7% SFF.

I read 70% fiction and 30% nonfiction this year. This is almost exactly the same breakdown as 2015.

63% of the books I read were written by female authors. 35% were written by men, and 2% had both male and female authors. This works for me.

55% of my 2016 books were backlist books; 39% were new; 6% were classics. This is a much better balance than 2015, when I read 71% newly published books.

19% of the books I read were published by indie or small press publishers; 79% were by mainstream publishers.

I made a handy pie chart showing how my Goodreads ratings stacked up. Over 80% of my reads in 2016 were rated either 3 stars or 4 stars.

Book statistics from NewberyandBeyond.com
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Only one of the books I read was one that I already owned! 3% came from Amazon; 20% were ARCs (that was surprising to me, but apparently it’s less than last year); 36% were from the library (not including the interlibrary loans I took out); 12% were from Paperback Swap (if you’re not on there, you should be!); 8% were from Scribd (my favorite online book subscription); and 5% were bought from thrift stores. The rest were borrowed from friends, given to me as a gift, found free online, or bought from various sources.

6% of the books I read this year were audio books, which is way up from any years in the past. 31% were ebooks, and the other 63% were print books (no surprise, as I still much prefer paper to reading on a screen or listening to a book).

I reviewed 76% of the books I read this year. Some of the 24% I didn’t review because I didn’t have much to say about them (or occasionally because I really hated them); others I read for personal reference.

At the beginning of 2016, I set some bookish and book blogging resolutions:

  • Up my diverse reading to 25% of all the books I read. As I already mentioned, I surpassed this with 33%. Woohoo!
  • Consistently blog 3 times a week. Ahem. Mostly. I did my best, but some weeks busyness got the better of me.
  • Add new kinds of posts, other than just reviews. I did this for a while, but I didn’t enjoy it as much as I thought I would. (My favorite non-review post is probably this one questioning whether or not we have too many WWII books.)
  • Improve my book photography and graphic design skills. I did this! At least mostly. The best thing I did was invest in some gorgeous stock photos and spend a lot of time redesigning my graphics. I also got a logo, which I love!
  • Participate more frequently in Top Ten Tuesday. Yep, but I’d love to do even more this year!

Now I’d like to set a few goals for 2017:

  • Write more joint book reviews. I love reviewing books with other people, and both my sister and husband have agreed to review books with me in the past. Look forward to more posts like these in the upcoming year!
  • Participate in Armchair BEA. This was one of the most fun things I did on my blog this year. I loved getting to connect with other book lovers through this event, and I can’t wait to do it again.
  • Continue to read at least 25% diverse books. This goal is more important to me than ever this year.
  • Put more bookish items on my Etsy shop. I have some ideas, but feel free to leave a comment if there’s a bookish idea you’d like to see in my shop!

I hope you all have a wonderful start to 2017! I’m wishing you the best of everything in the New Year and, of course, lots of wonderful reads.

Top Ten Best Books I Read in 2016

Linking up with the Broke and the Bookish to share my top ten best books I read in 2016. | NewberyandBeyond.com
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It’s the end of the year, which means tons of reflection posts and best-of lists (which I love!). I read many wonderful books this year, but these ten were the best books on my list. I recommend each of them wholeheartedly!

The Penderwicks series

If you enjoy Hilary McKay’s delightful writing style and quirky families, you must read this series. The Penderwicks are a family of sisters whose different personalities often clash, but who deeply love and take care of each other. They have fun adventures together and help each other adjust to the changes of growing up. I’m currently reading the fourth and latest book in the series, and so far each one has been just as wonderful as the last.

The Passenger

I don’t often read thrillers, but I greatly enjoyed this one. I read it practically in one sitting because I couldn’t put it down.

Come, Thou Tortoise

I was surprised at how much I enjoyed this book. Audrey has to come to terms with her recent loss, and as odd as our main character is, the writing style is just as strange–there are no question marks or quotation marks here. A quirky book with surprisingly lovable characters.

The Secret Adversary

I absolutely love Agatha Christie’s Tommy and Tuppence mysteries, so I really liked reading their first adventure together.

Thursday Next series

This series is a must read for book lovers and anyone who thinks a humorous time travel/alt history SFF series sounds awesome (it is).

Last Stop on Market Street

This is just a lovely picture book. Whether or not you have kids, you should pick this Newbery winner up.

Half the Sky

Heartbreaking and hopeful at the same time. If you care about women’s issues, you should read this book.

Abandoned America

I have a weird obsession with abandoned buildings, and reading this book made me realize I’m not alone. The author treks through various abandoned places, from a classic ghost town to an enormous mall, from hotels and vacation spots to theaters and mental hospitals. The photos are amazing, and he tells the fascinating stories of why each place was abandoned.

Dumplin’

A wonderful YA book about an overweight girl trying to fit in and stand out in her beauty pageant-obsessed town. All the characters are wonderful–they make bad choices sometimes, sure, but none of them are cringe-worthy–and I love the Texas setting.

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

This picture book is definitely one of the best books of this year. For any child (or adult) who wants to look at some beautiful artwork and read about the amazing women who shaped our world.

What were your favorite reads of 2016?

My Favorite Feminist Books of 2016

As 2016 draws to a close, I'm sharing my favorite feminist books that I read this year. | Book reviews by NewberyandBeyond.com
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It’s no secret that I care about women around the world, and my reading life often reflects that. I’ve recently read some incredible feminist and women-focused books, and I wanted to share some of my favorites with you. There are reviews of my newest reads, as well as a list of my favorite feminist books from earlier in the year.

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

If you haven’t heard about this lovely picture book, you must check it out! It was created through one of the most-funded Kickstarters ever, and I was lucky enough to be one of the backers.

This book is filled with lovely illustrations by female artists, and it features the stories of tons of women of various occupations, countries, and eras. It’s written for little kids, of course, but I think it’s enjoyable for adults too. If you have little ones (boys or girls) that you want to teach about important women of the past and present, you need Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls.

Rating: Re-read Worthy

A Century of Women

I picked this book up for 50 cents in a recent thrift store splurge, and I was surprised at how wonderful it was! Published in the late 90s or early 2000s, the “century” in the title refers to American women in the 1900s.

The main attraction for A Century of Women is the amazing collection of photographs and quotes from primary sources. From suffrage to workers’ rights, from family planning to representation in the arts, this book has a little bit of everything that has happened in American women’s 20th century history. It’s worth reading just to hear the varying opinions of women throughout this time and to view all the gorgeous photos.

Rating: Re-read Worthy

Half the Sky

Half the Sky is eye-opening and powerful. It reveals the horrible issues facing women around the world, from maternal health and economic inequality to sexual slavery, rape, and violence, as well as various failed attempts at understanding the culture and fixing the problems. Still, it offers hope and concrete steps to making a difference in women’s lives.

If you, like me, have a passion for women’s health and equality around the world, this book is a must-read.

Rating: Re-read Worthy

Jesus Feminist

If you’re a Christian wondering if feminism is for you, take heart! This book will offer hope. As someone who considers herself a Christian and a feminist, it was so exciting to find someone else who believes in equality and Jesus.

This book isn’t for everyone. Some of Sarah’s writing is a bit flowery and hippy-dippy. Still, if you can get past that, I’d say it’s worth a look.

Rating: Pretty Darn Good

Other books I’ve already reviewed that made my list:

Her Stories (children’s fiction)

Reading Lolita in Tehran (adult nonfiction)

The Girls of Atomic City (adult nonfiction)

The Princess Problem (adult nonfiction)

Interstellar Cinderella (picture book)

Good Girls, Bad Girls of the New Testament (adult nonfiction)

Untangled (adult nonfiction)

Excellent Daughters (adult nonfiction)

The Voice that Challenged a Nation (children’s nonfiction)

I hope these books give you a starting place for some wonderful feminist reading!

Ten Books I’d Like to See Under My Christmas Tree This Year

Linking up with Broke & Bookish to share my top ten books I'm thankful for. | NewberyandBeyond.com
I’m linking up with the Broke and Bookish for today’s Top Ten Tuesday post!

I’ve already received a couple of awesome books for Christmas (thanks, Secret Santa!), but there are always more books I’d love to receive. Here are just a few I’d like to see under my Christmas tree this year.

1. The Year of Living Danishly. This book sounds so fun! And sadly my library doesn’t have a copy of it.

2. Refuse to Do Nothing. This book on ending modern-day slavery has been on my TBR list for a couple years now, and unfortunately my library doesn’t have a copy! I want to have a copy of my own.

3. Hyperbole and a Half. I’ve already read this book, and it is hilarious! I want to be able to read this book anytime I need a pick-me-up.

4. The Terrible and Wonderful Reasons Why I Run. Another book that just sounds hilarious. I need more of those books in my life.

5. The Cardamom Trail. My husband and I got obsessed with The Great British Baking Show this year, and we fell in love with Chetna’s baking style. If I had this book, I could probably convince my husband to do some baking with me!

6. I’m Chocolate, You’re Vanilla. As someone who wants to adopt someday, this book on interracial adoption is a must read.

7. Quiet Power. I’ve read Susan Cain’s original book and enjoyed it a lot. I want to add this one to my stack of books!

8. The Princess Problem. I loved this book! I want to have my own copy for when I have children.

9. The Big Book of Christmas Mysteries. I’ve been reading my library’s copy of this book, and I loooove it! (You know how much I’m into mysteries.) I really want my own copy so I can reread my favorites every December.

10. Eleanor Roosevelt: You Learn by Living. Eleanor Roosevelt is my role model! I’ve read a lot about her, but I’d love to read a book that she wrote.

What books do you want to see under your Christmas tree this year?

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